Carbon dioxide sinks

  Yesterday,  whilst I was strolling in my city , I found some spiderwort species growing vigorously nearby and instantly This is what I saw:  epidermal cells and beautiful stomata amongst them. To my surprise, some (four?) subsidiary cells sorround the two guard cells that  make an stomata, a fact I did not know before…

The way I wish I had been taught.

Dear Foldscope community: In many occasions, since I have been using my foldscope microscope, I have had the opportunity to watch fresh water oligochaeta worms. They are very abundant in debris enriched waters and quite “huge” to be easily observed in detail.  When I was a University student, I don´t remember seeing them “in vivo”,-of…

A quick post to share some observations

Dear foldscope community: This is going to be a short post  due to such a busy time I am having. Just wanted to share with you a bit of the  hidden beauty  foldscope is allowing many of us to unveal. Isn't this a gorgeous adventure! A few days ago I was trying to image epidermal...

Microjewels.

                  Microscopic algae render my fascination every time I have  the chance to observe them .  Instantly,  I feel the need to pause for a while and to regard  admiringly not only their capability to transform inorganic matter (carbon dioxide, mostly) into organic molecules (glucose, for instance)…

Pollen grains as clues

          Every pollen image you can observe above  corresponds to a different plant species. Some have been  taken using foldscope low magnification lens, others by means of the high magnification one.  What is obvious is that you do not need to wonder about looking for several specimens (which, on the other...

A thorny issue urging a solution: biological control?

        This is Pennisetum setaceum, a grass  (Poaceae) known as purple fountain grass in many countries abroad. Where I live it is called "rabo de gato", which is to say "cat's tail", something easy to comprehend when seen as follows:        It has been introduced to many parts of the world...

Significant Biology learning

               As a Biology teacher, I am aware of how essential it is to find new methods and  strategies  in order to motivate students. I firmly believe this is the most important clue to improve educational systems achievements.  Foldscope illustrates this statement by demonstrating  its usage leads to real…

Epiphytic microorganisms on duckweed roots.

        I have been keeping a sample of common duckweed which I obtained from a freshwater fountain you can see in the next image. Whenever my duties allow me, I run and grab  my foldscope and inmensely enjoy watching the microcosmos under it. Refering to this plant (it is frequently mistaken as…

More on Rotifers….to be continued.

     Most rotifers are motile.  They swim by means of their corona cilia, as we have been able to see in former posts. Others are semisessile, attaching vía their foot and intermittently swimming or creeping, similarly to leeches locomotion. Nevertheless, some rotifers live in a secreted tube.  With this post I want to share with…

Teaching histology (plant tissue) using foldscope.

      As a Biology teacher, I do believe students do not only love but also need to learn by discovering Nature by themselves. Foldscope can make this  goal realistic. This is an example of what they did a few days ago. Students (11 th grade) were learning about plant tissues, especifically about epidermal…

Mosses or a world of wonders

              It is autumn and although not very rainy in the Canary Islands, we have been granted some rain these days. Mosses have awoken from a silent sleep. After exhibiting a brownish and dried complexion for months, they have switched into bright green patches glistening beautifully in the dull…

Hairs (setae) in action!

I found this worm in a fresh water sample and saw how it pulled in and out its blueish stiffened and short hairs. A climber in this microscopic universe. Cristina trim.D120BF5A-634B-4EF0-B3DF-4424F2129B2E

Animálculos que ruedan / Wheeled animalcules

Los rotíferos fueron observados,descritos y dibujados por el grandísimo microscopista holandés Leeuwenhoek, hace ya más de tres siglos. Los llamó animálculos que ruedan. Estas ilustraciones son un pequeño homenaje a él pues tener la fortuna de poder usar un foldscope puede hacernos revivir lo que debió sentir aquel pañero en una Europa que desconocía el…

Spirogyra’s beautiful chloroplasts

If I was given the chance to be an organelle, I would rather mute into a chloroplast, so magnificently coiled as the ones Spirogyra exhibits. It definitely must be amazing to make oxigen and organic compounds staring at the sun.     This is my very first attempt with foldscope, lacking high amplification lens and led light,…