5 Comments Add yours

  1. Aditi says:

    @Yash.. fantastic post. Keep it up micronaut. I wonder if the bubbles differ between soap, detergent, and the ones that are blown for fun (that typically contain added glycerine). Lots of bubble experts in this forum who can tell us cool things to do.

  2. laksiyer says:

    @Yash.. fantastic post. Keep it up micronaut. I wonder if the bubbles differ between soap, detergent, and the ones that are blown for fun (that typically contain added glycerine). Lots of bubble experts in this forum who can tell us cool things to do.

  3. Vaish says:

    Great post soap bubbles are very interesting!! looking forward to more posts.

    Vaish

  4. Manu says:

    Dear @Yash:

    Beautiful work.

    Interestingly; Manet’s and Chardin’s paintings of a boy blowing a bubbles are said to be the reflection of the artist at play.

    http://www.everypainterpaintshimself.com/article/manets_and_chardins_soap_bubbles

    So now; if I extend this analogy that an artist drawing bubbles is reflecting on himself; a microscopists drawing and imaging bubbles (which are essentially interfaces that have the capacity to bend like – just like a microscope) is also a reflection of the person’s own self.

    That is a fantastic subject you chose for your first post. Congrats.

    cheers
    manu

    ps: reminds me a lot of geometry. Just incredibly beautiful geometry – such as – why are all the angles equal to 120degree at junction points. It’s a complex answer; but long ago I tried to write something about it; you can read it here:

    http://www.npr.org/sections/krulwich/2011/12/16/143857923/when-bubbles-get-comfortable

  5. laksiyer says:

    Also see a previous post on soap bubbles describing interesting properties of such interfaces. https://microcosmos.foldscope.com/?p=527

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