A Wild (Strawberry) Adventure!

Today, we went for a walk around our neighborhood and saw lots of wild strawberries. We thought that they’d be interesting to check out so we both picked a couple and put them under our Foldscopes.

The strawberries are very round and not very transparent, so when we got home we sliced them into two thin sections; the skin and seeds, and the leaves of the strawberry.

The first thing we noticed was that the wild strawberries seemed to be watery, but we suspected that rather than water, it was the juice of the strawberry that was released when we sliced up the strawberry. We also noticed that each of the seeds were very visible, as giant red spots under the Foldscope.

When we looked at the part with the leaves, we could clearly see the cells of the strawberry, which looked almost like a honeycomb!

This is the juicy inside of a wild strawberry
This is the juicy inside of a wild strawberry
Here's the strawberry before slicing and the sliced version
Here’s the strawberry before slicing and the sliced version of the skin and seeds
This is the sliced leaves of the strawberry
This is the sliced leaves of the strawberry
You can see the strawberry juice in the bubble, and the large red splotches are the seeds
You can see the strawberry juice in the bubble, and the large red splotches are the seeds
Looks like a honeycomb! - But actually you can see the cells of the strawberry
Looks like a honeycomb! – But actually you can see that these are the cells of the strawberry
This is a really clear view of the strawberry's leaves
This is a really clear view of the strawberry’s leaves

2 Comments Add yours

  1. laksiyer says:

    Great post Reethi and Keerthi. Dont forget to foldscope the flowers (typically yellow) and get a picture of their pollen too, I can put it in our pollen database (credits included).
    https://microcosmos.foldscope.com/?p=4186

    Here is a challenge. You might have a picture of the micrometer scale, now can you estimate the size of the cell? Also, thinner the sections, more you can see. Good luck with hunting in the neighborhood. If there are any special insects associated with this, keep an eye for them.

    Finally, please make your pictures clickable. This is easy to do, go back and edit your post. Click on the picture, and hit the pencil (edit) icon of the many that pop up. You come to a page called image details, in the “Link to” option use “Media file” in the pull down. I think once you do this for one post, it remains so for all the other posts.

    Best,

    Laks

  2. Matthew Rossi says:

    Lovely! If you try this again, you might try freezing and cross sectioning the strawberry also, to get a look at how the structures of the plant connect with each other. You need to get a very thin section of it, but freezing it would help keep everything in place while you cut it!

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