The detection of basic macromolecules

This picture is the result of the detection starch with Iodine’s reagent
(From left to right: A1 Cow’s milk; A2 Rice milk; A3 Almond milk; A4 Chickken broth; A5 Fruit juice [Watermelon]; A6 Flour; A7 Soda; A8 Diet soda; Sample Test[unknown]; Positive Control (+) [Starch Liquid]; Negative Control (-) [Water])
The detection of protein with Biuret’s reagent
(From left to right: A1 Cow’s milk; A2 Rice milk; A3 Almond milk; A4 Chickken broth; A5 Fruit juice [Watermelon]; A6 Flour; A7 Soda; A8 Diet soda; Sample Test[unknown]; Positive Control (+) [Albumin]; Negative Control (-) [Water])
The detection of some types simple sugars with Benedict’s reagent
(From left to right: A1 Cow’s milk; A2 Rice milk; A3 Almond milk; A4 Chickken broth; A5 Fruit juice [Watermelon]; A6 Flour; A7 Soda; A8 Diet soda; Sample Test[unknown]; Positive Control (+) [Glucose 1%]; Negative Control (-) [Water])

In Labwork, my team performed the experiment which detect some macromolecules such as starch (carbohydrates), sugar (carbohydrates), protein.

We know that all living things consist of both organic and inorganic molecules. Organic molecules contain the elements Carbon (C) and Hydrogen (H), and more specifically, C-H bonds. Molecules lacking C-H bonds are considered to be inorganic. The organic molecules classified as carbonhydrates, proteins, lipids and nucleic acids include single unit monomers ( one unit molecules) as well as chains of monomers called polymers (many unit molecules)

In my team experiment, we have to test various food items for the presence of simple sugars, starch and protein using chemical reagents specific for each.

08/31/2020:10’30AM

One Comment Add yours

  1. Manu Prakash says:

    @thuan: Your post gave me an idea – what if you saw this color change at the microscopic scale under a foldscope. Watch the reaction happen live to see how the starch actually decomposes/dissolves.

    cheers
    manu

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