Protozoans

I found these little guys when I was observing the water of a flower vase and I thought it was so intereseting they could be there. Actually, you can found protozoans in almost any drop of water. Both organisms are of the group ciliophora and one of them belongs to the genus Vorticella.

Vorticella

I thought this little guy was a rotifer when I first saw it, but it was very small to be one. Then I started thinking that it could be a protozooan of the gender Vorticella and that made more sense. These organisms live in fresh water and have cilia to get their food; they also…

Water currents in the microcosmos

Watching different water samples under the Foldscope, I was fascinated by the variety of constantly active minute organisms, each with their unique ways of capturing food. Their feeding process, driven by tiny cilia, creates competing water currents on a single glass slide. Each minute animal makes its own whirlpool to suck food into its mouth…

Life in an ‘Organic pond’ – Part 2

Let’s explore more of the life in an ‘organic’ pond, continuing with the same water sample that we investigated for the last post. I now noticed a larva, about 5 mm long, swimming in the water. It was moving very fast, but I patiently followed it with a dropper and was finally able to pick…

Day 31: A colonial vorticella: First explorations with fixed focus and dark field

Day 31: 11. Vorticella (Alveolate->Ciliophora->Oligohymenophorea->Peritrichia->->->Vorticella) Ever since the first days of collecting the pond water sample (Day 1), I have been observing this feathery object floating around. I always thought it was a  feather fragment until today when I saw the object moving upwards and then in other directions almost with intention. I put it on a…